Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Vermack Village in the Desert?

Over in District 2 there is a desert.  This desert serves many purposes environmentally, politically and socially.  On the social side, the desert separates the Strawberry Festival kids of Village Mill from the aquatically gifted Vikings of Vermack.  Many brave youngsters have tried to shortcut it from the Village Mill tennis courts to the Vermack pool, never to be heard from again.  

In regards to the environment, the desert serves many purposes.  The openness allows for many to get their 'shine on.  Haymitch Abernathy (along with his sidekick GRB) is said to hang out here a good bit, until Katniss tracks him down.  The stream flowing through the property is not on par with the likes of the Chattahoochee River or the Vernon North Canal, but it is a stream, according to the Government.  




Politically the desert is high ground for the District 2 fringe movement.  President Snow is reportedly considering beefed up patrols in District 2, the masonry resource for the city.

But the desert and its surroundings are in for a change.  

President Snow is in negotiations with local leaders for 52 new homes to be built in the newly-named community of Vermack Village.  Key negotiating points are said to center around swim team recruitment, DJ Vermack's alleged retirement, the chimney at the PCID Starbucks, and a proposed underground tunnel to the BP gas station across from Dunkin Donuts.  DunwoodyTalk has already secured the timber rights to the property, thus again cornering the market on its newly trademarked DunWOODy line of clocks, bicycles, and baseball bats.

A major concern for the city is that any proposed action at this location may trigger a meeting of the famed Community Council, must see TV for sure.  Stay tuned as the property owners will need to overcome hurdles of a 25 75 foot stream buffer, bike lanes, Red Shirts, Green Shirts, and Dirty Shirts.  This proposed 52 home neighborhood ends speculation that the Brook Run Dog Park was acquiring the property for $5 million.  By the way, would Dunwoody taxpayers support a bond to buy the property, for a park, for $5 million?


area in red is flood zone




These 52 new homes are reportedly to be in the $750,000 + range, so a different market than the new homes being built in Georgetown.  Hopefully local Government and unorganized protest groups won't get in the way of this new project.

Alternative Dog Parks in Atlanta

I heard some chatter the other night at a political function - look for Brookhaven to build a dog park at Blackburn Park.  Of course Brookhaven has double the park space plus community centers.  And more importantly parks in Brookhaven are actually designed for human use.  Murphy Candler sees thousands of active kids during the summer and fall.  

A new dog park has opened in Atlanta, just a short drive for those using Vernon Jones dog park in Brook Run.

The wooded pocket park with a picturesque downtown skyline view has been transformed into District 2’s latest amenity, an off-leash dog park with designated areas for small and large dogs—the first such facility in downtown Atlanta. The dog park is another step in the ongoing Year of Boulevard initiative spearheaded by Atlanta City Councilman Kwanza Hall -
Director of Parks Doug Voss opted to quote Atlanta parks and recreation commissioner George Dusenbury in his comments to those assembled for the ribbon cutting. “Today we increase the number of dog parks in the city by 50 percent,” Voss announced to cheers and barks. “We only have two dog parks in the city, one in South Bend Park and one in Piedmont, and it’s been several years since they opened. That explains some of the challenges we face. That has not been the case with this creation of this dog park. This project came together faster than most of our projects, thanks to George, Catherine Chase, Kwanza Hall’s office, and of course, Park Pride.”
Park Pride executive director Michael Halicki lauded the community synergy present in the project. “We were able to a community building grant of $25,000,” he explained. “And then the parks department matched it with another $30,000, Councilman Kwanza Hall and District 2 came up with $10,000, and then Renaissance and Central park neighbors came up with an additional $15,000. This is what it looks like when a community works together.”
- See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf
The idea for reinventing Renaissance Park came in September 2012, when neighbor and park advocate Catherine Chase’s grant application to Park Pride yielded an awarded $25,000 startup check. “Most of the residents here live in multi-family homes and this park was underutilized, so it was a perfect opportunity to create something that would bring neighbors and dogs together,” Chase told Atlanta magazine. - See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf
The idea for reinventing Renaissance Park came in September 2012, when neighbor and park advocate Catherine Chase’s grant application to Park Pride yielded an awarded $25,000 startup check. “Most of the residents here live in multi-family homes and this park was underutilized, so it was a perfect opportunity to create something that would bring neighbors and dogs together,” Chase told Atlanta magazine. - See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf


AtlantaMagazine.com


The idea for reinventing Renaissance Park came in September 2012, when neighbor and park advocate Catherine Chase’s grant application to Park Pride yielded an awarded $25,000 startup check. “Most of the residents here live in multi-family homes and this park was underutilized, so it was a perfect opportunity to create something that would bring neighbors and dogs together,” Chase told Atlanta magazine



Park Pride executive director Michael Halicki lauded the community synergy present in the project. “We were able to a community building grant of $25,000,” he explained. “And then the parks department matched it with another $30,000, Councilman Kwanza Hall and District 2 came up with $10,000, and then Renaissance and Central park neighbors came up with an additional $15,000. This is what it looks like when a community works together.” - See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf 

Posted on 12/16/2013 11:58:00 AM by Richard L. Eldredge - See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf

The idea for reinventing Renaissance Park came in September 2012, when neighbor and park advocate Catherine Chase’s grant application to Park Pride yielded an awarded $25,000 startup check. “Most of the residents here live in multi-family homes and this park was underutilized, so it was a perfect opportunity to create something that would bring neighbors and dogs together,” Chase told Atlanta magazine. - See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf
See HERE for story at AtlantaMagazine.com
.

The wooded pocket park with a picturesque downtown skyline view has been transformed into District 2’s latest amenity, an off-leash dog park with designated areas for small and large dogs—the first such facility in downtown Atlanta. The dog park is another step in the ongoing Year of Boulevard initiative spearheaded by Atlanta City Councilman Kwanza Hall - See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.YmIZtQRJ.dpuf
The wooded pocket park with a picturesque downtown skyline view has been transformed into District 2’s latest amenity, an off-leash dog park with designated areas for small and large dogs—the first such facility in downtown Atlanta. The dog park is another step in the ongoing Year of Boulevard initiative spearheaded by Atlanta City Councilman Kwanza Hall - See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.YmIZtQRJ.dpuf

Director of Parks Doug Voss opted to quote Atlanta parks and recreation commissioner George Dusenbury in his comments to those assembled for the ribbon cutting. “Today we increase the number of dog parks in the city by 50 percent,” Voss announced to cheers and barks. “We only have two dog parks in the city, one in South Bend Park and one in Piedmont, and it’s been several years since they opened. That explains some of the challenges we face. That has not been the case with this creation of this dog park. This project came together faster than most of our projects, thanks to George, Catherine Chase, Kwanza Hall’s office, and of course, Park Pride.”
Park Pride executive director Michael Halicki lauded the community synergy present in the project. “We were able to a community building grant of $25,000,” he explained. “And then the parks department matched it with another $30,000, Councilman Kwanza Hall and District 2 came up with $10,000, and then Renaissance and Central park neighbors came up with an additional $15,000. This is what it looks like when a community works together.”
- See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf
Director of Parks Doug Voss opted to quote Atlanta parks and recreation commissioner George Dusenbury in his comments to those assembled for the ribbon cutting. “Today we increase the number of dog parks in the city by 50 percent,” Voss announced to cheers and barks. “We only have two dog parks in the city, one in South Bend Park and one in Piedmont, and it’s been several years since they opened. That explains some of the challenges we face. That has not been the case with this creation of this dog park. This project came together faster than most of our projects, thanks to George, Catherine Chase, Kwanza Hall’s office, and of course, Park Pride.”
Park Pride executive director Michael Halicki lauded the community synergy present in the project. “We were able to a community building grant of $25,000,” he explained. “And then the parks department matched it with another $30,000, Councilman Kwanza Hall and District 2 came up with $10,000, and then Renaissance and Central park neighbors came up with an additional $15,000. This is what it looks like when a community works together.”
- See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf
Director of Parks Doug Voss opted to quote Atlanta parks and recreation commissioner George Dusenbury in his comments to those assembled for the ribbon cutting. “Today we increase the number of dog parks in the city by 50 percent,” Voss announced to cheers and barks. “We only have two dog parks in the city, one in South Bend Park and one in Piedmont, and it’s been several years since they opened. That explains some of the challenges we face. That has not been the case with this creation of this dog park. This project came together faster than most of our projects, thanks to George, Catherine Chase, Kwanza Hall’s office, and of course, Park Pride.”
Park Pride executive director Michael Halicki lauded the community synergy present in the project. “We were able to a community building grant of $25,000,” he explained. “And then the parks department matched it with another $30,000, Councilman Kwanza Hall and District 2 came up with $10,000, and then Renaissance and Central park neighbors came up with an additional $15,000. This is what it looks like when a community works together.”
- See more at: http://www.atlantamagazine.com/agenda/2013/12/16/from-drug-market-to-dog-park-the-rebirth-of-renaissance-park#sthash.BvHPy4cJ.dpuf
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